Moran CORE

Open source ophthalmology education for students, residents, fellows, healthcare workers, and clinicians. Produced by the Moran Eye Center in partnership with the Eccles Library

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Control of Eye Movements

Title: Control of the Eye Movements: Neuroanatomy Video Lab – Brain Dissections
Author: Suzanne Stansaas, PhD, Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Utah
Date: 2015
Keywords/Main Subjects: Eye Movements; Neuroanatomy
Diagnosis: NA
Brief Description: Disturbances in eye movements can provide important clues for localization of neurological damage. The role of the frontal eye fields in horizontal gaze is stressed. The need to coordinate cranial nerves on both sides of the brain stem introduces the medial longitudinal fasciculus and its role in coordinating CN 3 and 6. Interruption of this pathway results in internuclear ophthalmoplegia and nystagmus both of which are demonstrated with a clinical video.

Eye Muscle Animation
Division of Anatomy, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada

Diagram of Cortical Control
Derek Cowan, Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah

Patient Video with INO
Daniel Jacobson, MD, University of Iowa
Kathleen B. Digre, MD, University of Utah

INO diagram from Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/internuc…

Specimens
Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, University of Utah

Produced by
Derek Cowan & Suzanne Stansaas, PhD

Format: mp4
Series: Neuroanatomy Video Lab – Brain Dissections
Identifier: Moran_CORE_26632
Copyright statement: Copyright 2015. Suzanne Stansaas, PhD, Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Utah. Please see terms of use page for more information.


Control of the Pupil

Title: Control of the Pupil: Neuroanatomy Video Lab – Brain Dissections
Author: Suzanne Stansaas, PhD, Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Utah
Date: 2015
Keywords/Main Subjects:  Pupil anatomy; Neuroanatomy
Diagnosis:  NA
Brief Description: 

Through diagrams, animations and gross specimens the constriction and dilation of the pupil by the autonomic nervous system are described. Both the parasympathetic and sympathetic control are traced and the importance of a constricted pupil, Horner’s Syndrome, and temporal lobe (uncal) herniation (dilation) are emphasized.

Pupil Size
Derek Cown, Eccles Health Sciences Library

Animation of Pupil Constriction
David A. Morton, PhD, University of Utah

Animation of Syndrome Pathway
Stephen C. Voron, MD, University of Utah

Produced by
Derek Cowan & Suzanne Stansaas, PhD

Format: mp4
Series: Neuroanatomy Video Lab – Brain Dissections
Identifier: Moran_CORE_26609
Copyright statement: Copyright 2015, Suzanne Stansaas, PhD, Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Utah.  Please see terms of use page for more information.


The Visual Pathway

Title:The Visual Pathway: Neuroanatomy Video Lab – Brain Dissections
Author: Suzanne Stansaas, PhD, Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Utah
Date: 2015
Keywords/Main Subjects: Visual pathway; Neuroanatomy;
Diagnosis: NA
Brief Description: A brief review of the anatomy of the eye and the photic stimulation of the receptors is followed by a gross exploration of the visual pathway from the optic nerve, chiasm, and tract to the thalamus stressing how the left part of the visual world reaches the right hemisphere. Visual fields are related the retinotopic organization of the visual cortex. The eye as a window to the brain and its important vascular supply is also discussed.

Diagrams from Webvision
http://webvision.med.utah.edu

Images of the Fundus
Kathleen B. Digre, MD, University of Utah

Flash animations of the visual pathway
Valerie Craigle, HEAL Project, Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah

Specimens
Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, University of Utah

Produced by
Derek Cowan & Suzanne Stansaas, PhD

Format: mp4
Series: Neuroanatomy Video Lab – Brain Dissections
Identifier: Moran_CORE_26596
Copyright statement: Copyright 2015, Suzanne Stansaas, PhD, Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Utah. Please see terms of use page for more information.